Breaking into the modeling industry

London, ON, Canada / 106.9 The X

Being a model is something many young girls dream of – posing in front of the camera, walking down the runway, wearing beautiful and expensive, high fashion clothing – but breaking into the industry, is no piece of cake. Literally!

While many often associate modeling with tiny bodies and unhealthy lifestyles, Anita Norris of Anita Norris Modeling Management, explains it takes much more than physical appearance to make it as a model.

She explains, “There’s gunna be a percentage of people who are dedicated, and there’s gunna be a lot of people who aren’t. Unfortunately in today’s society, everybody thinks that everything should just be there, and given [to them], and this business really weeds those people out. It’s those who will work hard for it and it’s just prevelant. You know, you can lead them to the trough, but if they don’t drink, it’s not gunna happen.”

“It takes more than just physical beauty to make it, you have to have a really good head on your shoulders.”

Noris adds that most models don’t often show up with the exact size and look required. What they do at the agency, is “train” girls how to live that lifestyle. “We really focus on giving them proper workout regimes and diet regimes – I don’t like calling it a diet, it’s a lifestyle. So, giving them options and ideas on how to change their eating habits and their workouts.”

Kristin M. is a model at Anita Norris and says it’s definitely an adjustment getting into the lifestyle expected by models. “Growing up, as a kid, I was never one that wanted to eat my greens, but now I just love making all different kinds of salads and throwing in all the different types of vegetables. I’ll eat any vegetable, any time, any where.”

She also says that during the nicer weather, she likes to run outside and do at home workouts. During the harsher winter months, she’ll go to the gym.

So, even though working out and healthy living is expected, there is still size and measurement requirements right from the get-go, “First thing we look at are the specifics. You have to be a 0-2 and between 5’7 and 6 ft tall for women.”

Sounds pretty typical, right? But it’s important to remember that there are also different categories within the company. Those particular specifics are for the fashion department. The commercial department broadens the size and height requirements a bit, and there is plus size modeling to consider as well.

The negative perception that often comes with the modeling territory typically has to do with the size requirements and assumed lifestyles that models live, but Norris says the history of her clients speaks for itself.

“Everyone’s opinion doesn’t matter, yours is the only one that matters. If you’re happy, you shouldn’t worry about what people say about you, or to you for that matter.”

She adds, “it takes a little bit more than just physical beauty to make it, you have to have a good head on your shoulders.”

And what does Kristen have to say to those critics? “I see it like high school, sort of. The people who are very of rude about that sort of stuff, they’re the mean girls. Everyone’s opinion doesn’t matter, yours is the only one that matters. If you’re happy, you shouldn’t worry about what people say about you, or to you for that matter.”

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